Wild Bird Feeding Blog | Chin Ridge Seeds
The Wonder of Bird Migration by Myrna Pearman

The Wonder of Bird Migration by Myrna Pearman

Bird migration is one of the most remarkable natural phenomena on the planet. Each spring and each fall, billions of birds take to the skies. In the spring, they head northward towards their breeding grounds, making long and often arduous journeys to take advantage of abundant sunshine and a cornucopia of food, especially insects.

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Purple Finches

Purple Finches

What a delight it is to see the first Purple Finches arriving back in April, with the males’ beautiful raspberry-red providing a welcome contrast to the dull grays and browns of the surrounding landscape.

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Chickadees - Our February Cherubs!

Chickadees - Our February Cherubs!

As I sit cradling a warm cup of coffee by the woodstove on a very cold winter’s morning, watching the chickadees at the feeder outside my front window, I can’t help but marvel at these little snow cherubs. How can they possibly endure such cold, harsh conditions?

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Project FeederWatch By Myrna Pearman

Project FeederWatch By Myrna Pearman

Project FeederWatch is a North American citizen science initiative that started at the Long Point Bird Observatory in Ontario, in 1976, with the Ontario Bird Feeder Survey. Cornell Lab or Ornithology came on board in 1987 in order to expand the program across the entire continent. Named Project Feeder Watch, the program is now a joint venture between Cornell and Birds Canada.

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Bird Migration by Myrna Pearman

Bird Migration by Myrna Pearman

Bird migration is a topic that has entranced and mystified humans for centuries. While new technologies are shedding light on the details of bird migration journeys between the north and the south (i.e., departure and arrival dates, distances traveled, stop-over locations, and overwintering areas), the full understanding of how the birds “know” when, how and where to migrate to/from still eludes human understanding.

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Very Rare Bird Spotted in Alberta

Very Rare Bird Spotted in Alberta

For several weeks this fall, a rare and beautiful bird enthralled birdwatchers from all over Alberta. The bird, a Yellow-throated Warbler, appeared in the backyard of a bird-feeding enthusiast east of Breton, Alberta on the afternoon of October 22, 2023. This was only the third record for the species in Alberta!

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How Can We Help Our Feathered Friends in the Fall by Myrna Pearman

How Can We Help Our Feathered Friends in the Fall by Myrna Pearman

Fall is a good time to start/resume a bird feeding program. Not only will supplemental feed help our avian neighbours survive harsh conditions, bringing birds into our yards and gardens also livens up the cold prairie winters.

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The Colours Of Summer

The Colours Of Summer

I highly recommend feeding birds during the summer months. The exception would be in areas where it is illegal (e.g., some National Parks) or where there is a risk of attracting bears. Otherwise, summer bird feeding adds great interest to any yard or garden because it attracts colourful and interesting bird species and provides new opportunities to observe bird behaviour, including courtship, nesting, and the feeding of young.

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June is Nesting Season by Myrna Pearman

June is Nesting Season by Myrna Pearman

Across the Canadian Prairies, June and July are the most active and interesting bird-related months of the year because it is nesting season! Upon arrival at their breeding grounds, birds need to recover from their migration before commencing the challenging tasks of setting up territories, finding mates, building their nests and raising their families.

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Spring Migration by Myrna Pearman

Spring Migration by Myrna Pearman

For bird lovers across the Canadian Prairies, May is one of the most exciting months of the year. As the gloom and cold of winter is displaced by warmth and longer hours of daylight, birds start arriving on their breeding territories or delight their human observers as they pass through on their way farther north.

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